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Posts Tagged ‘SUNDAY UK BLOG’

I was due to have an author on my show this last week whose co-written a book about partying, drinking games, and hangover cures after attending 15 Colleges in the US and not getting one academic success, except for being known for running some of the best ever college parties. Unfortunately the author was a “no show” for the radio program, so I never got a chance to exchange UK rugby drinking games with US college games.

One item I did find out though was that my guests favorite tipple was Bud Light.

How can a person who has classed themselves as a series beer drinker, have Bud Light as a favorite beer. I have known rugby clubs in England, when being asked for a Bud or Miller Light point the patron in the direction of the bathroom saying “the water tap is in there”. It is THAT WEAK.

This started me thinking about beers and the strength of beers in the US compared to England. A thought process that was enhanced when an article this week that BrewDog of Fraserburgh, a Scottish brewery, launched “Tactical Nuclear Penguin” what it described as the world’s strongest beer – with a 32% alcohol content.

A warning on the label states: “This is an extremely strong beer; it should be enjoyed in small servings and with an air of aristocratic nonchalance. In exactly the same manner that you would enjoy a fine whiskey, a Frank Zappa album or a visit from a friendly yet anxious ghost.”

Before you start working out the strength of the beer, one has to remember the way alcohol “percentage proof” measurements in the US differ to the UK.

In the US the percentage shown is basically half the strength, so something that reads 70% proof in the USA is 35% alcohol. In the UK 70% proof is basically (and these are not exact figures) double that. This being the case a 32% beer in England would almost equal a shot of Jack Daniels in the USA.

One of the items Americans always bring up when discussing beer, is that England has “warm beer”, this is really not the case. Any “good” pub that sells beer out the barrel which is hand pumped, rather and gassy carbon dioxide forced bubble baths, will keep there beer in a “cellar”, thus it is at “cellar temperature”.

After all the “almost frozen” beers that Americans seem to like, are so cold, one can never taste the true flavor, as at the first sip, your taste buds are frozen. Of course this loving of very cold drinks can be seen when Americans serve you a spirit or “shot”, as there is normally as much ice in the glass as caused the Titanic to sink.

This is not to say that there are not such beers in England, these cold fizzy drafts are normally termed under the term “Lagar”, with the likes of Bud, Fosters, Carling Black Label and Stella being available in most pubs in England.

While doing a little research into beers and the strengths I cam across a wonderful site called
Drunktionary, a wonderful place to find out all sorts of terms to do with drinking.

So while I go looking for a bottle of Tactical Nuclear Penguin, it just leaves me to say one thing.

“CHEERS”

Barry Eva (Storyheart)

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Can’t See the Woods for the Trees

When I used this expression the other day at work, I thought it must be one of those fairly modern idiom. I was quite surprised when I checked around for today’s UK blog and found that the saying thought to be around 500 years old.

Firstly though what is it’s meaning?

Can’t see the woods for the trees” or sometimes used as “can’t see the forest for the trees” is a phrase used on both sides of the pond, as well as the other side of the world UK, America and Australia). If someone can’t see the wood for the trees, they are unable to understand what is the big picture because they are giving too much attention to details.

“Mark is so focused on product details that he can’t see the forest for the trees when it comes to the overall needs of the company.”

Also reminds of “don’t sweat the small stuff (things)”

So where does the phrase come from?

UNABLE TO SEE THE WOODS FOR THE TREES – From “Heavens to Betsy” by Charles Earle Funk (Harper & Row, New York, 1955): “Too beset by petty things to appreciate the greatness or grandeur; too wrapped up in details to gain a view of the whole. In America we are likely to use the plural, ‘woods,’ or possibly to substitute ‘forest,’ but ‘wood’ is the old form and is preferable.

Actually, the saying is at least five hundred years old, and probably a century or two could be added to that, for it must have been long been in use to have been recorded in 1546 in John Heywood’s ‘A dialogue Conteynyng the Nomber in Effect of all the Prouerbes in the Englishe Tongue.’ He wrote ‘Plentie is no deinte, ye see not your owne ease. I see, ye can not see the wood for trees.’ And a few years later, in 1583, Brian Melbancke, in ‘Philotimus: the Warre Betwixt Nature and Fortune,’ wrote: ‘Thou canst not or wilt not see wood for trees.’

The saying has cropped up repeatedly from then to the present, becoming, in fact, more frequent with the passing years.”

UK VIDEO

I also thought I’d share with you a a video I made some time ago, about my England, the sound on Youtube sounds a little like it’s underwater, but I hope you enjoy it, and for those people from Across the Pond I hope it brings back memories.

Barry


Author of Young Adult Romance/Fiction book
Across the Pond
http://acrossthepond-storyheart.blogspot.com/
http://across-t-pond.com


OTHER SUNDAY UK BLOGSABOUT

THE GRAND NATIONAL
WHY UK DRIVES ON THE LEFT
MOTHERS DAY ACROSS THE POND
ABOUT THE UNION JACK
ENGLISHMANS VIEW ON BASEBALL
WHAT IS BOXING DAY
BRITISH TV TRANSPLANTS
WHO WAS SAINT GEORGE?
BOBS YOUR UNCLE
SWEET FANNY ADAMS
EUROPE’S GOT TALENT – WELL PERHAPS
GOBSMACKED, BOBBIES AND AN ARM AND A LEG
BIG BEN… OR IS IT?
THE USA NEEDS A CITIZENS CHARTER

FROM CHARIOTS TO NASCAR
WHAT IS FATHERS DAY?

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Tickety-Boo

Yesterday I was hunting around for a copy of a song I heard a while ago thinking to replace the opening music for my “Book and a Chat” radio shows which currently is set to “Tea for Two”. The reason being, the show is aimed to be a friendly chat between two friends over a cup a tea/coffee. The guests I have had so far and the show has been running since February with over forty shows so far and a waiting list for guests going into November.

Anyway I was looking for a song called “Tickety-Boo” by one of my favorite singers Ralph McTell, who sang the song along with Billy Connolly with the launch in October 18th 1999, Tickety-Boo is tea. The sales of this tea in eighteen months after the launch, Tickety-Boo had already raised over £50,000 to help children in India, China, Romania and Tibet.

The song not only starts with a whistling kettle coming to the boil but has such wonderful lines as…


“A little cup and saucery is magic in the morning.”

And…
“Tickety-Boo, isn’t that nice? The only cup of tea that makes you feel good twice. “

Needless to say I could not find my copy (old cassette) nor find a place on line to purchase or down load the music.

Today I did find the old cassette, and also why I had not played the music as the cassette due I would guess to little fingers was broken.

So while I hunt the internet for another copy I though I’d check up on the meaning of
“tickety-boo”

This is the best I have found…

There are a number of theories regarding the origin of the expression “tickety-boo” (also sometimes spelt “ticketty-boo”, tiggity-boo”) meaning “all in order, satisfactory, as it should be.” or ” Everything is going fine”.”Things are proceeding smoothly or quickly”.
It appeared in the early 1920s, well before World War II, and was in general use by the 1940s. It is still used in UK by people of “a certain age” and therefore has become rather old fashioned.
There is the theory that it is a relic of the British colonial presence in India and it may have originated in the British military. One of the most accepted and common theories about “tickety-boo” connects it to the Hindi expression “tikai babu” or “tickee babu” meaning “Everything’s alright, sir”.

So this week when people ask how you are feeling,just tell them.

“I’m tickety-boo”


Author of Young Adult Romance/Fiction book
Across the Pond
http://acrossthepond-storyheart.blogspot.com/
http://across-t-pond.com


OTHER SUNDAY UK BLOGSABOUT

THE GRAND NATIONAL
WHY UK DRIVES ON THE LEFT
MOTHERS DAY ACROSS THE POND
ABOUT THE UNION JACK
ENGLISHMANS VIEW ON BASEBALL
WHAT IS BOXING DAY
BRITISH TV TRANSPLANTS
WHO WAS SAINT GEORGE?
BOBS YOUR UNCLE
SWEET FANNY ADAMS
EUROPE’S GOT TALENT – WELL PERHAPS
GOBSMACKED, BOBBIES AND AN ARM AND A LEG
BIG BEN… OR IS IT?
THE USA NEEDS A CITIZENS CHARTER

FROM CHARIOTS TO NASCAR
WHAT IS FATHERS DAY?

Read Full Post »

Oldest WWI veteran dies aged 113

Henry Allingham, the world’s oldest man and one of the last surviving World War I servicemen, died at the age of 113 in England.
Though we still talk about World War I as indeed we should this now leaves just two British survivors from what is sometimes called “The Great War” not that any war is great.

Mr Allingham, the last survivor of the Battle of Jutland was very active right up to his final days. or decades, he buried his war memories, avoiding reunions and refusing to discuss the events with his family.

But, in 2005, he was persuaded to unveil an RAF memorial in France and decided it would have been disrespectful to his former comrades to refuse.

This was followed by numerous honors and accolades.

Second jogger attacked by buzzard

A buzzard has attacked another holidaymaker in Cornwall – the second such incident in a matter of days.

Eleanor Dennis, 19, was jogging near the Helford River on Saturday evening when the bird of prey attacked.

The teenager from Hertfordshire, who is on holiday with her family, was not hurt, but was badly frightened.

Last week Stuart Urquhart from Bristol needed hospital treatment after a buzzard slashed his head while he was out jogging near the Helford River.

Mr Urquhart suffered three 6cm (2in) long gashes on his scalp from the bird’s talons.

Bond’s Lotus bought for £105,000

James Bond’s Lotus Esprit from the film For Your Eyes Only has been sold to a Middle Eastern buyer for £105,000 at an auction in Oxfordshire.

Reply to Yesterdays Blog Question

I have had several replies to yesterdays blog question about Christian Literature. To me this is the best explanation, and I totally agree with what it should now really be called.

If you want to try and apply the term Christian Literature to mainstream literature, then perhaps we need to change the term to “Christian Friendly.” Meaning, Christian values are respected and sensitively dealt with – perhaps not in individual characters or the words used (blaspheming and such should be okay if the purpose is to create/motivate/ drive a character and not to just shock the reader). Christian Friendly literature would then, presumably, leave the reader with some kind of lesson or message or theme or or or… the list is quite endless… and the Christians to offend almost as endless. As you say Christian isn’t an easy term to define in literature. Interesting point!

Thank you to everybody for their comments. I hope you continue to enjoy my scribblings.


Author of Young Adult Romance/Fiction book
Across the Pond
http://acrossthepond-storyheart.blogspot.com/
http://across-t-pond.com


OTHER SUNDAY UK BLOGSABOUT

THE GRAND NATIONAL
WHY UK DRIVES ON THE LEFT
MOTHERS DAY ACROSS THE POND
ABOUT THE UNION JACK
ENGLISHMANS VIEW ON BASEBALL
WHAT IS BOXING DAY
BRITISH TV TRANSPLANTS
WHO WAS SAINT GEORGE?
BOBS YOUR UNCLE
SWEET FANNY ADAMS
EUROPE’S GOT TALENT – WELL PERHAPS
GOBSMACKED, BOBBIES AND AN ARM AND A LEG
BIG BEN… OR IS IT?
THE USA NEEDS A CITIZENS CHARTER

FROM CHARIOTS TO NASCAR
WHAT IS FATHERS DAY?

Read Full Post »


I have been asked to share some more old English Phrases and origins of them. So that will be today’s blog.

GOLF

Many years ago in Scotland, a new game was invented. It was ruled “Gentlemen only… Ladies Forbidden” …and thus the word GOLF entered into the language.

SAVED BY THE BELL/DEAD RINGER

England is old and small and the local folks started running out of places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to a “bone-house” and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, 1 out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive. So they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the “graveyard shift”) to listen for the bell; thus, someone could be “saved by the bell” or was considered a “dead ringer.”

CAT LET OUT OF THE BAG

In the Royal Navy the punishment prescribed for most serious crimes was flogging. This was administered by the Boatswain’s Mate using a whip called a cat o’ nine tails. The “cat” was kept in a leather or baize bag. It was considered bad news indeed when the “cat was let out of the bag. ” Other sources attribute the expression to the old English market scam of selling someone a pig in a poke (bag) when the pig turned out to be a cat instead.

NO ROOM TO SWING A CAT

The entire ship’s company was required to witness flogging at close hand. The crew might crowd around so that the Boatswain’s Mate might not have enough room to swing his cat o’ nine tails, hence “No Room to Swing a Cat”

CUT THROUGH THE RED TAPE

Solicitors kept their clients papers in a file folder tied with red ribbon to prevent the papers from falling out. Of course, when they wanted to get at the papers, they would have to cut through the red tape.

GETTING A SQUARE MEAL

Your dinner plate was a square piece of wood with a “bowl” carved out to hold your serving of the perpetual stew that was always cooking over the fire. The kettle was never actually emptied and cleaned out. New ingredients were simply added to the muck. You always took your “square” with you when you went traveling.

UPPER CRUST

Visitors to the Anne Hathaway’s cottage (near Stratford upon Avon) are given this explanation while looking at the bread oven beside the fireplace in the kitchen: “The bread was put, as a raw lump of dough, straight into the bread oven. No bread tin, it just sits on the floor of the oven. The oven is heated by the fire and is very hot at the bottom. When the bed is done baking and taken out to cool, the base of the loaf is overcooked black and also dirty. The top of the loaf is done just right, and still clean. The bottom of the loaf is for the servants to eat, while the upper crust is for the master of the house.


Author of Young Adult Romance/Fiction book
Across the Pond
http://acrossthepond-storyheart.blogspot.com/
http://across-t-pond.com


OTHER SUNDAY UK BLOGSABOUT

THE GRAND NATIONAL
WHY UK DRIVES ON THE LEFT
MOTHERS DAY ACROSS THE POND
ABOUT THE UNION JACK
ENGLISHMANS VIEW ON BASEBALL
WHAT IS BOXING DAY
BRITISH TV TRANSPLANTS
WHO WAS SAINT GEORGE?
BOBS YOUR UNCLE
SWEET FANNY ADAMS
EUROPE’S GOT TALENT – WELL PERHAPS
GOBSMACKED, BOBBIES AND AN ARM AND A LEG
BIG BEN… OR IS IT?
THE USA NEEDS A CITIZENS CHARTER

FROM CHARIOTS TO NASCAR
WHAT IS FATHERS DAY?

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So what to write about this week? The weather… well anybody who has seen any of Wimbledon Tennis this week will see the UK is having the sun that the east coast of the USA isn’t getting.
Or perhaps about Sport?
Running Marathons (as in the picture). The fact that in the USA Soccer finally hit the head of the sports pages as the US Team not only beat Italy but then went on to beat the current world champions Spain to reach a final game against Brazil. The fact that the British and Irish Lions Rugby tourists lost the second game (of three) against South Africa, in a brutal match that ended up with 5 of the Lions players needing hospital treatment, and that loss to the very last kick of the game.

Instead it has been pointed out to me that I have been a little lax in blogging about more of the old English Phrases and origins of them. So that will be today’s blog.

SON OF A GUN

After sailors had crossed the Atlantic to the West Indies, they would take the native women on board the ship and have their way with them in between the cannons. Some of the women the sailors left behind would have boys, who were called sons between the guns.

PATENT LEATHER

After the Patten shoe which the young women wore in the buttery. When the cream spilled on their shoes, the fat would tend to make the leather shiny.

MINDING YOUR Ps & Qs

Ale was served at local taverns out of a “tankard” … you were charged by the angle of your elbow … half-way up… you drank a pint, all the way up… you drank a quart. Since the Quart cost so much more than the Pint, you were warned to “Mind your Ps & Qs”

It has also be related to a short hand way of saying… “Mind your please and thank you’s”

WET YOUR WHISTLE

Many years ago in England, pub frequenters had a whistle baked into the rim or handle of their ceramic cups. When they needed a refill, they used to blow the whistle to get some service.

FROG IN YOUR THROAT

Medieval physicians believed that the secretions of a frog could cure a cough if they were coated on the throat of the patient. The frog was placed in the mouth of the sufferer and remained there until the physician decided that the treatment was complete.

RULE OF THUMB

An old English law declared that a man could not beat his wife with a stick any larger than the diameter of his thumb.


Author of Young Adult Romance/Fiction book
Across the Pond
http://acrossthepond-storyheart.blogspot.com/
http://across-t-pond.com


OTHER SUNDAY UK BLOGSABOUT

THE GRAND NATIONAL
WHY UK DRIVES ON THE LEFT
MOTHERS DAY ACROSS THE POND
ABOUT THE UNION JACK
ENGLISHMANS VIEW ON BASEBALL
WHAT IS BOXING DAY
BRITISH TV TRANSPLANTS
WHO WAS SAINT GEORGE?
BOBS YOUR UNCLE
SWEET FANNY ADAMS
EUROPE’S GOT TALENT – WELL PERHAPS
GOBSMACKED, BOBBIES AND AN ARM AND A LEG
BIG BEN… OR IS IT?
THE USA NEEDS A CITIZENS CHARTER

FROM CHARIOTS TO NASCAR
WHAT IS FATHERS DAY?

Read Full Post »

It seems to have been another long week, yet still the same five days of work, funny how sometimes those five days turn into eight or so it feels.

So what is there heading my way this weekend?

Saturday is looking like a fun day.

At 11:00am (EST) at “A BOOK AND A CHAT” my very special guest is Sarah, better known at “GREENBEANTEENQUEEN” nominated for YA blog of the year, advid reader, tween and teen librarian and recently married. Should be a fun 30 minutes with more to cover than I have time for, but we’ll cram in what we can.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/Across-the-Pond

Saturday Evening I have my karaoke show, with all the madness that brings. Always a fun evening.

My Sunday UK blog this week will be about the Eurovision Song Contest which most people outside Europe might not know about, but it’s been a must for 56 years and brought you ABBA amongst others.

Sunday night at 11;30pm I am a guest on “Before bedtime” not sure about before it’s well after my bedtime, but should be fun.

Finally today’s weird news…

Polish priest publishes sex guide
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8049853.stm


Author of Young Adult Romance/Fiction book
“Across the Pond”

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